16 april 2024

Association between alcohol consumption and peripheral artery disease: Two de novo prospective cohorts and a systematic review with meta-analysis

AIMS: The association between alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is inconclusive. We conducted this study to examine the association between alcohol consumption and PAD risk in two de novo cohort studies and a meta-analysis of observational studies.

METHODS AND RESULTS: A systematic review was conducted to identify studies on alcohol consumption in relation to PAD risk. We further used data from two cohorts of 70,116 Swedish and 405,406 British adults and performed a meta-analysis of results from previously published studies and current cohort studies. There was a U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and incident PAD risk in the Swedish and British cohorts. The meta-analysis of results of these two cohorts and previously published studies found that compared with non- or never-drinkers, the relative risk of PAD was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-0.89), 0.81 (95% CI 0.74-0.90), and 0.94 (95% CI 0.83-1.07) for light, moderate, and high-to-heavy alcohol drinkers, respectively. The nonlinear meta-analysis revealed a possibly U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and PAD risk (P-nonlinearity <0.001). The risk of PAD was observed to be the lowest for 2 drinks/week and to be pronounced for >/=10 drinks/week. All these associations persisted in a sensitivity meta-analysis including cohort and other type of observational studies.

CONCLUSION: Alcohol intake </= 2 drinks/week was associated with a reduced risk of PAD and the risk of PAD became pronounced with intake >/=10 drinkers/week.
The association between alcohol consumption and the risk of peripheral artery disease is conflicting between studies and thus remains undetermined. In the two de novo cohort analyses, we found a U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and peripheral artery disease risk in the Swedish and British populations. In the meta-analysis, light-to-moderate consumption of alcohol was associated with a reduced risk of peripheral artery disease. The dose-response meta-analysis showed that the risk of peripheral artery disease became pronounced for alcohol consumption >/=10 drinkers/week. This is an observational study that cannot infer causality between alcohol consumption and peripheral artery disease risk. We are not able to assess the specific associations to different types of alcoholic beverages.
eng

Additional Info

  • Authors

    Yuan S.; Wu J.; Chen J.; Sun Y.; Burgess S.; Li X.; Akesson A.; Larsson S. C.
  • Issue

    Periodical: Eur J Prev Cardiol - Edition: 20240416
  • Published Date

    16 april 2024